Solid Surface Ad & Review

Simulated reprint from SOLIDSURFACE, VOLUME 2, NUMBER 5, OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 1996

 Sawing Solid Surface?

Want a Glass Like Finish?

Try Everlast

 astra logo

solsadsajdas

 418 N Poplar
 South Hutchinson, KS 67505
 1-239-596-3333
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As you well know the Solid Surface market is one of the fastest growing. Most fabricators believe it will continue to be in the future.

Until now when it came to cutting solid
surface, most fabricators also cut it
with conventional saw blades and lived
with the fact that sanding and polishing
were the next necessary steps after sawing.

 Up to this point that was true, but no longer.

Everlast has developed a new series of solid surface saw blades specifically designed to give cuts that are chip free and a surface finish so smooth that sanding and polishing are virtually eliminated.

They are available from stock in 8", 220mm,
10" and 12" diameter and can be supplied on
special order in other sizes.

These blades are fully guaranteed by Everlast, a company who for over 40 years has specialized in meeting the demands of the woodworking industry.

 
PRODUCT REVIEW

Everlast
Solid Surface
Saw Blade
  This is exactly what hap- pened with the solid surface market. What Farengo heard from fabricators was that there was a need for a saw blade that would produce a cut that did not require any extra sanding or polishing. In an extensive research and development effort that was more like "an elimination process," samples of different solid surface materials as well as samples of cuts made by other blades were all tested and evaluated. Prototype blades were made and tested in-house, then sent out to shops for more testing in the field. Blades were brought back, changed slightly, and sent out again, and then again. The final result is their new "Astra SS," a saw blade specifically designed for cutting solid surface materials.   SolidSurface did its own small test of the Everlast blade, giving one to each of our Fabricator Advisory Board shops to try. Of the three shops that were able to use the blade, all reported that the quality of the cut was extraordinary. It did indeed appear "smooth," "polished." The volume of cuts achieved with the blade was either equal to or exceeded the blades they normally used. Interestingly, two had problems after sharpening, with the cut not being as smooth or lasting as long. One of the "problem" blades was returned to Everlast, where it was discovered that it had not been properly sharpened. Sharpening to exact factory tolerances is extremely important. Points out Everlast's Josephine Farengo, and not all sharpeners have the same degree of expertise or quality-consciousness. The process is so critical to how the blade performs, however, that Everlast offers a free service to any owner of one of their blades. They can have their sharpener call Everlast, who will give him the exact specifications for sharpening the blade, and even walk him through it if necessary. This proved to be the case with the "problem" blade. When properly sharpened, it performed exactly as it had when new.
 The Everlast company only manufactures carbide tipped saw blades, and they had already garnered a reputation for quality when they began to focus their efforts in a slightly new direction. The explosion in the last few years of new materials on the one hand, and new tools by the manufactures on the other, began their move into the manufacture of specialty blades. They would hear "over and over again" from their customers that the blades that were available in the market were not doing the job with a new material or application, according to co-owner Vincent Farengo.